Trading Standards eCrime

Two more people have been sentenced after pleading guilty to their roles in one of the biggest online conspiracy cases in UK legal history. Liam Hincks received 11 months in prison on Monday 26 March – which took into account his cooperation with the prosecution – and Caroline Gowans received a two year suspended prison sentence, on Tuesday 27 March.

Six people have today (6 March 2018) been sentenced to a total of more than 35 years in prison after being convicted of defrauding UK consumers out of over £37 million in one of the largest UK online crime cases. They operated a number of ‘copycat websites’, impersonating official government services to sell passports, driving licences and other key documents for vastly inflated prices.

Six people have today (6 March 2018) been sentenced to a total of more than 35 years in prison after being convicted of defrauding UK consumers out of over £37 million in one of the largest UK online crime cases. They operated a number of ‘copycat websites’, impersonating official government services to sell passports, driving licences and other key documents for vastly inflated prices.

  • Defendant misled consumers by claiming to be from reputable computer firms
  • Investigation in conjunction with computer firms helped secure conviction
  • Defendant misled consumers by claiming to be from reputable computer firms
  • Investigation in conjunction with computer firms helped secure conviction
  • Man sentenced to five years and ten months for fraudulent business

 
A man who ran a large Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) check fraud has been sentenced to five years and ten months at York Crown Court today (18th December). Marcus Ashcroft-Jones pleaded guilty to charges relating to websites set up by the defendant to process DBS checks for job seekers who had been told that they had been successful in their job applications. The reality was that the advertised jobs simply didn’t exist and the DBS checks were totally unnecessary.

  • Man sentenced to five years and ten months for fraudulent business

 
A man who ran a large Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) check fraud has been sentenced to five years and ten months at York Crown Court today (18th December). Marcus Ashcroft-Jones pleaded guilty to charges relating to websites set up by the defendant to process DBS checks for job seekers who had been told that they had been successful in their job applications. The reality was that the advertised jobs simply didn’t exist and the DBS checks were totally unnecessary.

A National Trading Standards spokesperson said:
“Yesterday (Tuesday 12 December), officers from National Trading Standards conducted raids at a number of properties across the UK. These raids are part of an ongoing investigation looking into unfair practices in the secondary ticketing market and particularly the practices of businesses that buy and sell tickets in bulk.

A National Trading Standards spokesperson said:
“Yesterday (Tuesday 12 December), officers from National Trading Standards conducted raids at a number of properties across the UK. These raids are part of an ongoing investigation looking into unfair practices in the secondary ticketing market and particularly the practices of businesses that buy and sell tickets in bulk.

People are losing £141 on average after signing up for a ‘trial’ offer only to later find money has unexpectedly been withdrawn from their bank account, new research from Citizens Advice finds.
The bulk of sign-ups happen online (77%) where businesses can hide information, through the use of pop-ups or smaller font for example, making it easy for people to miss terms and conditions. And nearly a quarter (21%) of people spot an ad for a ‘trial’ on social media or online marketplace, like Facebook and eBay.